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F these great trees could speak, they 
would tell you a thrilling Storyof Wood. 
Their ttory is told for them in the 
following pages. Read it! It is a story 
touching the dawn of man, that sketches 
the Epic Romance of America — the ad ven 
turous subjection of the forests of the savage 
wilderness to the populating, upbuilding 
and enrichment of this blessed land. 



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"And out of thm ground mmdm thm 
Lord Ood to grow mvmry trmm thmt i« 
plmmtmnt to thm tight , thm trmm of Itfm 
a/to in thm midtt of thm Omrdmn. mnd 
thm trmm of knowtmdgm of good mnd mv 



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In the beginning the tree wta the 

tymbol of life and the revelation of 

human dcttiny. We picture the 
Garden of Eden •• embowered in 

treet. Treet provided 
d Wood the ark that saved the 

chosen remnant of the 
human race from the Deluge 

In the depths of the forest prehis 
toric man found a refuge from hit 
enemies Wood gave him his weap 
oni, alto hit tools. Wood inspired him to build out 
of branches and leaves the first human edifice. 

With the patting of time the tublime ttructure of 
he towering trees exerted so great an influence upon 
the human race that there came into being a crude but 
genuine architecture. The first columns and pillars 
were the trunks of trees, and the various orders of 
architecture were developed from humble shelters of 

logs and timbers 

Even in the early days of the Kings of Israel, archi- 
tecture, with the forest at itt ally, had idvanced a long 
way. When 8olomon built the great temple he turned 
lumberman on a mighty tcale and sent 80,000 woods 
men to the mountains to cut and hew fir trees And he 

s of Lebanon. 



called 



King 



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ceda 









MATERIAL OF HUMAN PROGRESS 



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Because it is a product of life, man 
has always felt for wood a close kin- 
ship. It has been a true friend to him, 

and all down the 
years has retained 
his affection and 
his confidence. 



Foundation of 




atton 



Naturally when 

man began to venture beyond the 

immediate environs of his own 

settlement, it was in conveyances 

made of wood; such conveyances as the primitive 

raft, the canoe dug out of a log, the crude sled, the 

bullock cart. 

For four thousand years all the maritime commerce 
of the world was transported by ships built of wood. 
The wealth of the Greek states and of Rome itself was 
largely due to the command wood gave of the sea. 

It was in tiny vessels of wood that Columbus con- 
quered the unknown waters of the West; in ships built 
of the same staunch and faithful material DaGama 
rounded the Cape of Good Hope, and Magellan 
achieved the circumnavigation of the globe. 

In sloops and square riggers made of wood our fore- 
fathers won their way from the Old World to the New. 
Out upon the broad bosom of the Atlantic floated the 
Pilgrim craft that was freighted with the genesis of a 
nation. Those who watched from its fog-drenched deck 
beheld the "wind tossed branches," that welcome J 
them to a new, strange and beautiful land that, eve 
in the language of the wilderness, spelled Home. 

In brief, wood carried the adventurous spirit of ma 
out over the globe and pioneered the paths of progres 
leading toward modern civilization. Actually, I 

particularly here in 




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FOUNDATION OF THE N 



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You can scarcely turn a page 
early chapters of American History 
without seeing a picture of wood i 

some form. 



Atner 



stockades 



eatness 



re 
fuge against hos- 
tile Indians. 
Corn cribs and barns, both built 
wood, protected crops^ and live 
stock. Within the stout walls* of 
the log cabin, the Colonists and their children shared 
each other's joys and sorrows. They sat in Wood 
chairs. They ate at wood tables. They slept in wood t*d 

Wood built the schools where on benches of v> 
and behind wood desks, studied and day-dreamed 
the future signers of the Declaration of Independence. 
In meeting houses, built of wood, the Pilgrim Fathers 
sang hymns and made their simple offerings to God. 

And it was in town halls, constructed entirely of 
wood, that the very foundations of our Government 

vere established. 

Not forgetting the all -important part that wood^ 
played in the life of trade and commerce. 

The very first cargo sent back to the old land from 
Virginia was cedar logs. Pine was a principal export 
of the New England colonies, and later was the back- 
bone of frontier trade. 

Wood provided the ships and canal boats of the 
early days. It built the docks and wharves on which 
were loaded and unloaded the products of the farm, 
the plantation and the sea. It built, too, the factories 

hich soon began to spring up one after the other in 
scores of fast-growing towns and cities along the 
Atlantic seaboard. ^ ^ ^S 




Wood built th 










MOTHER 



OF 



INDUSTRIES 





Turn on through the pages of his- 
tory, and you will find wood again 
pioneering the patht of progrett; 
thit time clear across the continent. 

The gold seekers and 

an Gold wttlcri cvcr advanc : 

ing westward and 
opening up for posterity a vast new 
empire, made their journey in cov- 
ered wagons built of wood. After 
them came the wood stagecoach 
and the railroad, supported on ties of wood. And 
then the telegraph and the telephone— bot h striding 
ever forward on poles of wood. 

Picture, too, the long trains of freight cars; cars 
bringing from the forest to the prairie huge shipments 
of lumber that quickly housed the in-pounng millions 
in the most economical comfortable and healthful of 

buildings. t a , 

And down the rivers to mill and yard floated vast 

rafts of logs. Right to the far edge of the forest lands 
the logger and lumberman pioneered with trapper and 
tettler. Always the first mill was a lumber mill. Lumber 
was the pioneer industry, carpentry the pioneer craft. 

The natural wealth of the magnificent forests was 
largely converted into buildings and other property 
thereby were multitudes employed, trade stimulated 
and fertile land cleared for thriving farms. 

Countless industries, based on wood, sprang up over 
the land to balance agriculture and animal husbandry. 
The real El Dorado of America was not in its gold 
coasts, but in its glorious foretts. All the gold that has 
come out of America since Cortex and Piiarro looted 
the Aztecs and Incas is not equal in value to the forest 
products and their manufactures in a single year. 




WOOD ENDURES FOR AGES 



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The "Home, Sweet Home" of John 
Howard Payne meant a home housed 
in lumber. And surely it is significant 
that seventy -five out of every hun- 
dred dwellings 

Sweet Home" ej^tcd in the 

United States 
today are of frame construction. 
George Washington, as you know* 
chose wood for lovely Mount Vernon. 
And remember that the wood house 
in which John Alden wooed Priscilla 
is still occupied and in good condition. In fact, there are 
scores of old Colonial Mansions, built long before the 
Revolutionary War, which are as livable today, and as 
sound in timber and beam, as the day they were built* 
Fine examples of these homes, some erected almost 1 
300 years ago, may be seen in such far ,ous old towns as 
Plymouth, Fredericksburg and Williamsburg. %Jfiut* 
The simple truth is that there is a charm ancT fl 
dignity about a well-built wood house that cannot 
be successfully imitated. And the more completely 
wood is used, the more you will be impressed by^its 
traditional beauty. Enter a home in which you are 
welcomed by a graceful wood staircase, a fireplace 
trimmed with wood, and wood paneling, and you will t 
sense in the very atmosphere a spirit of hospitality. ^ 
You may be especially interested in knowing that 
the wood home of today can be built even more sub- 
stantially than in the Colonial Era. In fact, the appli 
cation of modern methods of structural engineerin 
assure lumber framing that is practically hurricane- 
proof, vflr?** 
Wood is also most desirable for house - building 

because it is a natural insulator against heat and cold 
This gives it a grea^ advantage over the mineral 
building materials, and. assures greater comfort ~" 
the year round. 



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Nothing but durable material! shall be 
u^lnlheconrtTuc. ^^ _#^ 

tion erf thlt houie— wr>% -«^'^-^ >w 






WOOD 



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B E A UTIFUL 




»/ the 
Wood 




Wood combines strength and stiff- 
ness with lightness, an important 
factor in buildings of all descriptions 

and all in the work of 

life. Weight for weight, 

it is stronger than steel 

It is resilient and shock 

absorbing. It is easily 

sawed, carved, planed and lathed to 

any desired pattern; it may be bent 

or twisted, and is readily shaved to 

paper-like veneers and plywood. It can be quickly 

and firmly nailed, doweled, joined or glued into place^ 

Wood has beautiful natural textures, grains and 

figures. Its color is varied and pleasing; it may be easily 

stained and painted, thus affording much variety of 

appearance from a single species. It is easily applicable 

in large units, and yet those units arc not rigid, being 

rpable of facile alteration on the job with hand-tools, 
brick is a brick, but a board may be reduced to many 

pieces of many shapes. 

Wood is durable. Chariots of antiquity have come 
down to us with their wooden parts still sound. In 
Japan there is an intact wood temple erected thirteen 
centuries ago. Many wood articles were taken from the 
3500 year old tomb of Tutankhamen. Good lumber 
has been made from tree trunks that have lain six 
hundred years on the forest floor. The "Constitu 

cji's" oaken "iron-sides" are being partly rebuilt of 
wood that has been stored under water for fifty years 

by the United States Navy. 

cod is plentiful, inexpensive, and capable of 
ual replacement by natural processes through th 

mysterious laboratory of the leaf, wherein tunhgh 
works its miracles. 




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SUPPORT 



OF 



M ILLIO N S 




'National Welfare 







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The bulk of the producing forests is 
now in the southern and Pacific coast 
states, but no less than thirty states 

produce impor- 

ItlduStrieS and tant quantities 

of timber. The 
wood-using in- 
dustries, how- 
ever, are in every state; and some 
of the states that now have but 
little timber lead in the manufac- 
ture of wood products. The efficiency of our railway 
system and of the coastal shipping facilities enables 
forest products to be distributed freely everywhere. 
It is stated on good authority that the forests are the 
source of support of about one-tenth of our population, 
ranking next to agriculture in that respect. About 
1,200,000 persons are on the pay-rolls of the forest in- 
dustries and those that depend directly upon them, 
and their annual wealth production is around four 
billion dollars. The annual railway freight bill of the 
lumber industry is about $400,000,000. 

Wood is the principal raw material of some seventy 
groups of wood-working industries, and of many thou- 
sand plants, besides being the chief source of paper and 
yielding many industrial chemicals. There is scarcely 
an industry that does not use wood incidentally if not 
depending entirely on wood as its raw material. 

In the World War the wood ship was swiftly re- 
vived a thousand strong for the emergency, to supply 
the bridge of ships that led to victory. In a thousand 
other ways wood contributed to the victory of the 
Allies — from American spruce for the airplanes of the 
Allies and walnut for rifle stocks, to the piling 
timbers of the vast war ports that we built on 
sides of the Atlantic, and the multitude of canton 
ments and other war -purpose buildings." 

All ^M s^ 
















thp AMERICAN INDUSTRY 



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At firtt rudely hacked* chipped, bent 
or burnt to shape, wood it now the 
product of mills that are equipped 

with the moat efli- 



Woneer 
** Industry 




cient and powerful 
machinery that the 
science and ingen- 
uity of man can de- 
vite and perfect in this age of quan- 
tity production. 

America now hai individual mills 
that make a million feet of lumber a day— equivalent 
to two hundred 5 -room houses— and at the same time 
dry, dress, tongue and groove, and mold a large part 

of it. 

Back of the mills in the American forests is great 

equipment for cutting the trees and getting the logs to 
the mills. Thirty thousand miles of logging railroads 
(which is more railroad than most nations have) count- 
less locomotives, donkey engines, tractors, chutes, 
flumes, dams, canals, tugboats, rafts, cablcways, aerial 
trolleys and horses, handled by an army of 200,000 
stalwart men, wrest the heavy and bulky logs from 
their fastnesses in mountain and swamp and convey 
them to the gleaming, whirring saws. 

The word "lumber" itself is an American-made 
name. So the industry, as well as its product, is dis- 
tinctly American. In point of value of product, capital 
investment and number of persons employed — taken 
together— it Is the first American industry in rank as 
well as in time. Always a pioneer industry, it has been 
first to last typically American— an industry of great 
physical feats, prompt action, reckless daring. It has 
produced the capital as well as the capitalists for later 
industries and has bred a body of men in office, field 
and csunp that have always been high among 
human assets of the nation. — ^ 






VAST FORESTS STILL STAND 



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Due to a widespread misunderstand- 
ing in the mind of the public regard - 
ing conservation, the idea has gone 
abroad that the use of substitutes is 

necessary in order to pre- 

Wood tcrvc *k e forests. This is 

not true, There is a right 

wood for every need, there is plenty 
of wood both for new uses and for old . 
Of timber fit for sawing into lumber 
we still have nearly half as much as 
when the first Pilgrim axeman chopped his first 
tree in New England — notwithstanding the hundreds 
of millions of acres of timberland that have been 
permanently cleared to make room for farms, roads, 
and the homes of more than a hundred million 
people. The United States Forest Service tells us that 
almost a quarter of the entire land area of the country 
is still forest land. There is actually more land for grow- 
ing trees than there is for crops and farm pastures. 
With care of our forest land we shall probably have 
more forest products a hundred years hence than now. 
We still have about 135,000,000 acres of virgin 
forests. That means that if they were gathered to- 
gether they would make a solid forest belt 70 miles 
wide, extending from New York to San Francisco. 
Then there are "about 255,000,000 acres of cut-over 
forest land that are growing new trees in some degree, 
and about 80,000,000 acres that are practically unpro- 
ductive. Put all the forest land into one belt 225 miles 
wide— the distance from New York to Washington 
and again it would reach from New York to San Fra 
Cisco. The area of these timbered regions is more th 
three times that of all Franot— equal 
iotas, sixteen Pennsylvania*, or seven Oregon* 




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Lumbering is a giant industry, re- 
quiring tremendous investment, and 
the highest order of engineering 
talent. The first operation, after 
building railroads, stretching great 
logging cables and setting up power 
units in the forest, is to "fall" the 
trees, cut them into logs and trans- 
port them to the mill. Sometimes 
great rafts are built. 



Often logs of several species come 
in the same shipment. The logs are 
dumped into ponds at the mill both 
for storage and to make it quick and 
easy to select and grade them. They 
are then lifted into the mill by 
endless chain conveyors. Skilled 
lumberjacks manipulate the logs, 
using long pikes to keep them 
moving. 



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After the log is drawn up into th 
mill it is kicked into place by stear 
"niggers," it is held firmly in plac 
on the log carriage by mechanic! 
"dogs." The log is then shuttle 
back and forth as the teeth of th 
giant band saw first cuts off th 
slabs and then cuts slices from whic 
are made boards and timbers, t 
cants for resawing. 



Modern sawmills are equipped 
with batteries of kilns where the 
green boards are scientifically dried 
by steam heat so as to reach the con- 
sumer in perfect condition for use. 
The operation requires much skill 
and the men entrusted with this 
responsibility are highly paid experts 

usually graduate engineers. 



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After the lumber is properly dried , 
the boards are sent to the planing 
mill where they are perfectly finish- 
ed, according to the use to which 
they are to be put . All transfers of 
logs and lumber in the mill are made 
by fast automatic conveyors. One 
process succeeds another in rapid 
succession throughout the mill. 



Of primary importance in the 
lumber making processes is inspec- 
tion and grading. This is done at 
various stages of manufacture, and 
checked and rechecked for accuracy. 
Manufacturers listed in this book- 
let grade according to American 
Lumber Standards, endorsed by 
the Federal Government. 



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Lumber is distributed to retail 
dealers by railway and steamship 
transportation. It is loaded by care- 
ful workers and the grading is again 
checked. At the retail yards it is 
stored on raised platforms, and the 
same careful handling is .required 
when reloading on trucks for local 
delivery to the ultimate purchasers. 



The process of manufacture and 
delivery has been completed. From 
the far-off forest thousands of men 
and millions of dollars worth of 
equipment have brought for your use 
nature's supreme building material. 
Use American Standard Lumber, 
build well, and your home will be 
a joy to you and your children. 



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NEW^ FaRESTS FOR 



OLD 



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it to be lott by 
forettt. That it 



There are vatt areat of unbroken 
forettt in the Wett and South where 
there it no new growth of timber, 

becaute the ripe 

erpetUalh tree,, rotting and 

r / falling, cumber the 

dblc earth and prevent 

new generations. 

The thriftily producing forett it the 
one that it being providently uted. 
Nothing it to be gained and much 
allowing good wood to watte in the 
the reaton why it it good national 
economy to continue to cut the virgin forettt. That it 
why it it right and proper to ute wood freely for all 
reasonable purpotet. In doing to we not only prevent 
watte and make way for timber growth, but we tet up 
a stable market for forett productt which enablet the 
forett owner to manage hit foreitt to that new treet 
may come on while the old onet fall. "The ute of tub 
stitutet," taid Pretidcnt Coolidge in a recent addrett. 
"hardly keept pace with the new utet for wood. 
There it no likelihood that we can become a woodlett 
nation even if we wanted to." 

A mott fortunate thing about the ute of wood it 
that it it the one great natural retource that it poten- 
tially incxhauttible. Conceivably, all of the mineralt 
may be one day cxhautted. Dig out a mine and you 
have nothing left but a gaping hole. Cut a tree and a 
new one or maybe many will grow in itt place. Several 
European nations have more forettt, detpite continuous 
ute, than they had two centuriet ago; but where will 
you find a mining region that hat more ore than it had 
two centuriet ago. 

It it entirely probable that in time to come we thall 
have to increate our ute of wood, in order to take the 
placet of forever exhausted mineralt. 






<%t. 



USE 



IS 



CONSERVATION 




station 



#.• • 



Our forests have the greatest va- 
riety of useful species of wood in 
the world. There are more than 100 

species of American 

Ho ft dftd f° rcst trees, in com- 
mercial use; some 
thirty of them in large 
volume. They include 
many kinds of soft and hard woods 
— woods for necessity and woods for 
luxury— and respond to almost every 
tree use known to mankind; not forgetting food, such 
as maple sugar, nuts and fruits. 

Nor is this all. The forests are always growing, and 
today 30 per cent of all forest goods comes from land 
from which the trees have been cut off one or more 
times in the past three centuries. 

But while America has an ample supply of w 
there is of course a real need for conservation. 

Conservation, as applied to forests, means the har- 
vesting and use of the ripe trees, whilst maintaining 
the forests as a whole; it does not mean preserving 
trees until their natural death and fall. 

Such conservation is a business— just as much as 
farming— indeed it is a sort of long-term farming that 
deals with' colossal plants, instead of small ones. 

Left alone, nature reaches a balance of death and 
decay with new growth. Man steps in and substitutes 
use for decay and waste. 

Wood is a crop. It needs to be cut when ripe. Failure 
to do so means waste. 

The United States Government owns about a hun- 
dred million acres of forest which the Forest Service 
administers on that principle. Congress created these 
great public forests as sources of a "perpetual supply 
of timber for the people of the United States." 






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THE TNDTSPENSABLE MATERIAL 



Ten years ago but 2,000 uses of wood 
could be enumerated; a census now 
in progress has already discovered 

over 4,500. 

Radio cabinets 
and shipping boxes 
demand hard and 
soft lumber in enor- 
mous quantities. Radio has opened 
such a market for lumber that there 
have been times within the last t\ 
years when the lumber used in radio cabinets 
certain territories was more than went into house 



Lumber Finds 
ening Markets 



building. 

The films of the moving picture industry are derive 

from the cellulose of wood; and were it not for th 
millions of feet of lumber that go annually into all 
those castles, palaces, cities and landscapes of the 
make-believe world of the movie scenes, pictures 
would be scarcer and dearer. 

Almost every new development in industry brings 
out new uses for wood, even when intended to do away 
with old ones. It means as much to industry as it does 
to housing. Even mining and the metallurgical in- 
dustries lean upon it, if for no other reason than 
because wood must be used for props and cribbing in 
tunnels and shafts. All our network of steam, and 
most of our electric railways rest upon wood cross-ties ; 
wooden freight cars prevail; boats and ships cannot 
do without wood; few bridges dispense with it en- 
tirely. The whole land is staked out with tens of 
millions of telegraph and telephone poles and billions 

of wood fence -posts. 

Look around voul Doors and window frames and 




mi* 




WOOD PERPETUALLY 



«P 





ever 



sash are almost universally of wood, 
as is fully 85 per cent of all house- 
hold and office furniture. The auto- 
mobile industry consumes 
/ flfld huge quantities of lumber 

for body frames, wheels, 

floors, steering wheels and 
shipping cases. Other 
cles and most agricultural imple 
ments — farming itself — and a hos 
of tools find it indispensable. Wood 
gives us chests, cases, trunks, bar- 
rels, boxes, crates, handles of all sorts, printing furni 
ture and wood-cuts for illustrations, picture frame 
signs, musical instruments, airplanes, toys, toothpick 
pencils, pens, clothespins, pointers, sewing machine 
the innumerable forms of woodenware, laundry appl 
ances, utensils, tanks and silos, refrigerators, gate 
garden furniture, pulleys, shuttles, spools and bobbins 
textile and a great array of other machinery, boot an- 
shoe findings, saddles, even patterns and flasks fo 
iron and other foundries, forms for concrete work, 
ladders, building scaffolds, water conduits; and so on 
from cradles to coffins. \ 

You can no more play than you can work without 
wood. No new miracle of science promises to replace 
wood for mallets, bats, clubs, racquets, billiard cues, 
bowls, pins, etc. Imagine Babe Ruth swatting a 
home run with a bat made of formaldehyde and phenol 
or some other new fangled product ! 

The whirlpool of industrial and commercial change 
may yet deflect an enormous volume of demand to 
lumber ; the world may eagerly return to the material 
that can be produced forever without exhaustion, a 
material that is simply a usable physical form of 
elements that eventually return to their disunited 
condition. Eternally producible wood, instead of being 
the target of substitution, may become the universal 
substitute to piece out the dwindling supplies of non- 
replaceable inorganic materials. 






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RBBj 




A NEW 



AGE FOR WOOD 



( 







gram of 



Research 



Under the leadership of the National 
Lumber Manufacturers Association, 
the manufacturers and distributors 

of American 
Standard Lum- 
ber and the prin- 
cipal wood-using 
industries have 
carefully planned pro- 
arch in forest conserv- 
ation, wood utilization and im- 
provement in the manufacture and use of lumber 
and other forest products. The opportunities are great 
for enlarging the already colossal field of wood's mani- 
fold uses due to its numerous inherent virtues. 

Different species of wood have different physical 
characteristics and chemical properties. Only through 
scientific research can these be developed and utilized 
for the service of the consuming public and the pro- 
gress of the wood-using industries. Wood, in its natural 
state, has commercial and industrial uses already more 
diversified than any other material; yet protected by 
suitable chemical treatments— against fire, decay and 
insect attack — the field of lumber and wood uses may 
be vastly increased. Lumber is America's most versa- 
tile construction and industrial material. Its sourc 
the forests— being perpetual, it will always be avail- 
able in abundance, with wise use and prudent economy. 
Such a unique material deserves every effort of 
science and industry to enhance its intrinsic value. 

The practical objective of this program of research 
is to develop satisfactory uses and wider markets for 
all the lumber which the forests yield ; to find new and 
practical ways of utilizing the by-products of lumber 
manufacture ; and to stimulate the practice of forestry 
systematic growing of new forests for future needs. 



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FOR THE PUBLIC BENEFIT 



AriWc 



The chief beneficiary of the re- 
adjustment of the lumber industry 
and trade will be the American 

home, for the larger 

ft Lumber part of the lumber 

n' ' ll-flUf mi j used in construction 

Standards Adopted goes into house 

' "'* building. A lumber 

industry that improves its methods 
of manufacture, that refines its 
products and finds means of aiding 
nature in the perfection of her wonderful material 
will serve American home builders in building their 
homes and in their daily life. 

Those beloved interiors which only wood can give 
and nothing successfully imitate, will always be the 
privilege and delight of the American people. For pan- 
eling, stairways, finish, trim, floors and even ceilings, 
they will be assured of lovely and enduring w 
the woods of home. 



♦ • ♦ 






Recently the leaders of the lumber industry have 
reorganif ed their business structure to meet the require- 
ments and conditions of the times and have made a 
great many improvements in trade practices. Among 
them was the adoption of new high standards of 
manufacture, quality, inspection, and uniformity of 
dimensions. This places the lumber industry on a plane 
of dependable dealing with the public. This was 
difficult of attainment so long as there were thirty or 
forty more or less different systems of grading and 
sizing lumber, along with a great variety of confuting 
names for the different qualities and specie^. Now 
you may send a boy to a lumber yard to buy for you 
without hesitation, provided you tell* 

sise and sort of wood he is to 
specify American Standard Lu 



grad 







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TO 



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SERV E MAN ALWAYS 





Flow 

Distribution 




This reform which Herbert Hoover, 
Secretary of Commerce, says is the 
best illustration of what American 

industry as a 
whole has accom- 
plished during the 
recent years of 
waste elimina- 
tion, simplification of manufactur- 
ing practice and the extension 
standardization, was initiated ^ 
the industry itself. It was carried through with 
support and endorsement of the United States F 
Service and the Department of Commerce America 
Lumber Standards are, therefore, United Sta 
government standards. 

The typical American material for the Americ 
home is now available through the best methods and 
processes of modern manufacture and distribution. 

The organized lumber industry of the United States 
is the expression of the nation's relation to and 
dependence upon the forests and wood. Through it, 
accumulated knowledge and understood experience 
will be applied to the forests — to maintain them; to 
their products — to spread their beneficence. 

t 

The general adoption of American Lumbe 
Standards — applying to all species of timber- 
made lumber distribution and utilization simply and 
easily obtainable. The channels of trade are now open, 
unclogged by misunderstanding, doubt or dispute, 
from the mills in the forest, through dealers in city) 
and village, to those dear and lovely homes of lumber 
that have been and always will be the pride of th 
American people. 







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Sources of National Lumber Trade Extension Funds 






ABERDEEN LUMBER & SHINGLE COMPANY A Morton' M*sslMippl~ 

ADAMS BANKS LUMBER COMPANY • • • - • • Vfttfij " £ f inc o C» 

ALBION LUMBER COMPANY Hobart Building. 8ftn r ™ , " BC {: |0 J 1 J a 

AWlER-SULLIVAN LUMBER COMPANY .... SK^l' W.iiWi» Co mhu ' O hln 



ATOLL^N A LUMBEH COMPANY . . """SX-nd Klo W.* 

J. UAY ARNOLD LUMBER .COMPANY yKlT Minnesota 

W. T. BAILEY LUMBER COMPANY "..QtXeJttle, Indiana 

(HAS. H. BARNABY ... •••••• " Wetfir Bulidlmr Portland, Oregon 

BEAVER UMBER COMPANY Imcinc "k au atn Falls Oreuon 

BIO LAKES BOX COMPANY. ... •■•••••■••• Yarnvtlle. South Carolina 

BIO 8AIJCEH ATCHI E C YPHES8 COMPANY ?3SE5«ffil, Wisconsin 

BISSELL LUMBER COMPANY....... Gable, South Can. Una 



BROOKS & ROSS EU XI BLR COMPANY Uend ore-.'on 

BKOOKS-SCANLON LUMBER COMPANY Eaatprnt. Florid, 



CARR LUMBER COMPANY 

CASCADE LUMBER COMPANY.. 



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I'ivitii ■ n, T (OK f COMPANY •.V.V.'.V.'.'. . .".Keith & Perry Buildin,-. Kansa* CI. 
iS^\^i^^ii^Bmoi^m::m Board of Trade Build.,,,. Senior ..Pel 



th Carolina 

Washington 

M Isaflurl 
nnsylvanla 

Houston. TV* 

CLEVELAND LUMBER COMPANY Cloquot. Minnesota 

CLOtjUET LUMBER COMPANY .. . Lnvalton. California 

CLOVER VALLEY LUMBER COMPANY U | inelander. Wlaconsn 

C C. COLLINS LUMBER COMPANY..-, xSws 4. Tennessee 

; < >NA8AUOA RIVER UMBER COM' ANY \v"cn5ster. Idaho 

CRAIG MOUNTAIN LUMBER rOMPANY • Toaaett. Arkansas 

I ROSSETT LUMBER COMPANl . >. Box No.' 76 Jacksonville. Florida 

CUMMER CYPRESS CO) PANY . . . ^ . . .. uox ' Cadillac. MlChlWII 

CUMMER D1GGINS LUMBER COMPANY Aberdeen. Mississippi 

C. C. DAY LUMBER COMPANY Memphis. Tennessee 

R. .1. DARNELL. INC........... ...Ashland. Kentucky 

DAWKINS LUMBER COMPANY Ueer ,. aik> Washington 

DEER PARK UMBER COMPANY,.- Kansas City, Missouri 

D1ERKS LUMBER * WAI^MPANY..". 463' California St.. Sun Francisco. Cal. 

OOLBEER A: CARSON LIMBER COMPANY ™° <-•« 074 TMon , a . Washington 

ERNEST DOI/GE. INC Odessa. Florida 

THE HOWLING COMPANY •■ Laurel, Mississippi 

EASTMAN. GARDINER A COMPLY., .. . ^ . . . . / - ^^ ^- ^Francisco. Cal. 

ELK RIVER MILL «c LUMBER COMPANl -* Evansville. Indiana 

EV ANSVILLE VENEER COMPANY kiamath Falls. Om 

EWAUNA BOX COMPANY. .... ..... •■••;•. it ' a ' i^ntr Building Kansas Cttv, Missouri 



runir.ii iia i »«*»»•» "~; y'""" a - , rr-r< . . . s»iire\eiwiri, i.i>ui»i«u« 
FROST LUMBER 1NDI STRIES INC Laurel. Mississippi 

GIRCHR1ST FORDNEY COMPANY Goodman, Wisconsin 

GOODMAN LUMBER .COMPANY .-•■:.■ ;..7"7... Oulf Hamn.ock. Florida 

GROVE DOU1.INO HARDWOOD tOMP ANY iSArVZmnmtm Street. San Francisco. California 




HOBBS WALL (, ™'"V r ;;w Columbia. South raroiina 

HOFFMAN LUMBER COMPANY. .....;. Monadnock Bulldlmr. San Francl* , Cal. 

HOLMES EUREKA UMBER COMPANl lonaunw. ..Oconto. Wisconsin 

HOLT LUMBER COMPANY ...■ r 1v „ | lllllS( Alabama 

HORSE SHOE LUMBER < UMPANY Sandpolnt. Idah-. 

HliMBIRD LUMBER COMPANY . ...... ./....Aberdeen. Washington 

INDEPENDENCE LOGGING COMPANY Lockhart. Alabama 

JACKSON LOfflElt COMPANY .. . . ftldcrw-d. Alabama 

E E. JACKSON LUMBER COMPANY Bamhenr, South Carolina 

J. F. JENNINGS . ••■■■•■:■„. .'.'*'.'....... Clnqurt. Minnesota 

JOHNSON- WKNTWOimi COMPANl g , Bulldim:. Birmingham, Alabama 

KAUL LUMBER COMPANY c -'" 1 " c Potta Camp. Mississippi 

T A KEEN LUMBER COMPANY - Sullltent. Alabama 

KENTUCKY LUMBER COMPANY Klrbj BuUdlnu. Houston. Texas 

KIRBY UMBER COMPANY. hland. Kcntuckv 

PFSMHS%^1Sta>«: «c : ::: : . : : : ■ • • • ■ • £— Jgfis: 



Sources of National Lumber Trade Extension Funds 

(Continued) L .... 

C. ft W. RKAMEll COMPANY W- C »?^L. liSS 

LaUHANDK BOX * LUMBER COMPANY CrSJftJftr'nISSf 

1 AMM LUMBER COMPANY , .Modoo Folnt, uragon 

LASSEN LUMBER ft BOX COMPANY..".'.'.'. 403 Monadnnck Building, San £»™l«co. £«W»™J» 

LITTLE UIVKH REDWOOD COMPANY Balfour Building, Sin Eranclaoo. California 

LITTLE BIVEH LUMBER COMPANY ^ TownM ?I?: T »" nM, *T 

ONO-BELL LUMBER COMPANY B. A. Lon* Building. Ran** City. I llHour 

IA>XU-BKLL LUMBER COMPANY ^KlTii. niuun. 

LYON LUMBER COMPANY .Oiiyvllle. Lou a Una 

MoC ABBOLL LUMBEB COMPANY. INC Bat™ Rouge, ^iliiu 

McCLOUD BIVEB LUMBER COMPANY k M< u Ioud, uF.! l i!J?ffi« 

MoQOLDRlCR LUMBER COMPANY .^......M.y ... ...... ... .... 8 !T* 4n & *,VS lD p.T 

MADERA HUOAH PINE COMPANY Ctockif Flftt National Bank Bldg .. San Franolico, Cal. 

MALEY ft WEBTE LUMBEK COMPANY 224i E. Columbia ft Belt R B. IrMiflllt, Indiana 

MALVERN LUMBEB COMPANY tV.Eli inilttlUJli 

MABATMON LUMBER COMPANY n V'W'.v? "rKKK 

.1 A MATItlEU. LIMITED «•}"> Like. Ontario 

MEADOW BIVEB LUMBEB COMPANY iLs . Baindle. * Ml Mwln a 

MICHIGAN C ALIFORM A LUMBEB COMPANY .CtmBw. California 

T 11. MILLER MILL COMPANY, INT . • ■ Bww *? n * t iJS5 l "J! 

N ATALBANY LUMBER COMPANY • • • • • ■ . .Hammond. LoUlalana 

J. NEILS LUMBEB COMPANY Nonhweatern Bank Building. Portland. Oregon 

NOBTH BEND TIMBER COMPANY North Bend, Waahtngton 

NORTHERN LUMBER COMPANY „■••;• -Cloquet, Minnesota 

NORTHEAST LUMBER COMPANY , . ^ .Huntington, Weil \ Irglnli 

NORTHWESTERN COOPEHAOE & LUMBER COMPANY .Gladetone, Mtohlgitl 

OAKLAND LUMBER COMPANY . • • Or§aa, Weat Virginia 

OCONTO COMPANY... IIT Ballwar Exchange Building. Chicauo. Illtnota 

OWENOREOON LUMBER COMPANY . • • Medford. fjragon 

PACIFIC LUMBER COMPANY 311 California Street. San Pranclerp. California 

PACIFIC SPlii'CE CORPORATION NdHhweitern Bank Building. Portland. Oregon 

PARADISE LUMBEn COMPANY .ParadlM. Cal fornta 

PEAHL RIVER VALLEY LUMBEB COMPANY Canton. Mtatltalppi 

PEAVY MOORE LUMBER COMPANY Shrreeport. Lou a ana 

PEAVY-W1LHON LUMBER COMPANY Mirwtiort. toulaiana 

PELICAN BAY LUMBER COMPANY. Rlamath Falla, Oregon 

VICKERINO LUMBER COMPANY KanaaaCltir. Mlaamirl 

PIONEER LUMBER COMPANY vv E,w f A ' Bbtm * 

POLLEYM LUMBER COMPANY MtMOUla. Montana 

POTLATCH LUMBER COMPANY ...PoGatch. Idaho 

PROUTY LUMBER ft BOX COMPANY W»rrenlon. Owon 

PUTNAM LUMBER COMPANY' .JaekMnetlle. Florida 

RED RIVER LUMBEB COMPANY 807 Monadnock Building. San Franclecn, rallforn a 

BEYNOU>S * MANLEY LUMBEB COMPANY ~ • Y • itY *2?* l ^ J?*2. rB ! B 

C. L HITTER LUMBER COMPANY. Huntington, Weat Virgin a 

W. M HITTER LUMBER COMPANY . .- Col ummie. Ohio 

ROCKCASTLE LUMBEB COMPANY Huntington. Wait Virginia 

EDW RUTLEDOE TIMBER COMPANY Coeur d'Alene. Idaho 

ST ANDREWS BAY LUMBER COMPANY Mlllrllle. Florid* 

ST PAUL ft TACOMA LUMBER COMPANY Tacoma, Waahlngton 

SAWYER OOODMAN COMPANY Marinette, ttlaoonatn 

JNO SCHROEDER LUMBER COMPANY Milwaukea. Wlaconiln 

W. W. SEYMOUR ....... Tacoma Building. Tacoma. Waahlngton 

S HE V LIN- CLARKE COMPANY. LIMITED Ft. Francea. Ontario 

SHEVLIN-HIXON COMPANY Bend. Oregon 

SCHUSTER SPRINGS LUMHER COMPANY ... Chapmen. Alabama 

SILVER FALLS TIMBER COMPANY Slltarton, Oregon 

W. T SMITH LUMBER COMPANY Chapman. Alabama 

8NOQU ALMTE FALLS LUMBER COMPANY Bnoqualtnie FalU, Waahlngton 

SOUND TIMBER COMPANY . M6-7 Henry Building. Seattle. Wiehtngton 

SOITHERN LUMBER COMPANY... .Warren. Arkaneai 

SPRINO cRRER LUMBER COMPANY Union Truat Building. Clnctnnetl. Ohio 

STTMSON TIMBER COMPANY 700 Weatlaka N. Seattle. Waahlngton 

SUGAR PINE LUMBER COMPANY Bog 501, Plnadale. California 

SUMTER HARDWOOD COMPANY ... Sumter. South Carolina 

SUNSET TIMBER COMPANY Raamnnd. Waahlngton 

W P TANNER .Wllderneee. Virginia 

THOMPSON WELLS LUMBER COMPANY. . Menominee. Mlrhlaan 

THUNOER LARS LUMBER COMPANY ... Rhinrlander, Wlaroniln 

TREMONT LUMBER COMPANY . .Roehellf. t/niUUna 

UNION LUMBER COMPANY. 1010 Crocker Building. Ban Francl*^. California 

VIROINIA A RAINY LAKE COMPANY ... Virginia Mlnm-aota 

VIRGIN PINE LUMBER COMPANY... PJotyuna. MlMlaali.pl 

VON PliATEN-FOX COMPANY Iron Mountain. MKIiUan 

WAUSAU SOUTHERN LUMBER COMPANY Laurel. MlMteelpi t 

WEI S PATTERSON LUMBER COMPANY. INC ...... .Panaacota. Florida 

WESTPfiRT LUMBER COMPANY Northweatem Bank Building. Portland. Orenon 

WEYERHAEUSER TIMBER COMPANY faeoma. Waahlngton 

WEYERHAEUSER TIMBER COMPANY Eerrttt Wtahlnirton 

WTLDERNEAS LUMBER COMPANY... Nallen W»at Vlralnla 

WILLAPA LUMBER COMPANY.. Rarmond, Wiahlnai 

F B WILLIAMS CYPRESS COMPAM Pattrr«on Lnulalana 

WILSON CYPRESS COMPANY Palitka. Florldi 

WINTON LUMBER (OMPANY Olbht Idaho 

TAWREY BTSSELL LUMBER COMPANY Whltt Laha Wtarontin 

COOStSATINt ORQANItATIONt 

BRITISH OOLT'MBIA LUMBER AND SHINOLE MANUFACTURERS ASSN . 

Metropolitan Bxuldlm Vanoouter Brlttftt Columhu 

BRITISH COLUMBIA 1/>OOERS ASSN Metropolitan Building. Vanoomer. Brttlah Cniumhit 

MAPLE FLOORS'. MA VCK ACTI'RERS ASSOCUnON 1740 McCormiA Building. Chleago. Illlnoli 
NATIONAL -AMERHWV WHOLESALE LUMBEU ASSO«M ATION 41 Eaat 42nd Street. K*w Yor- ^ V 






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THESE arc the trees that build 300,000 
homes a year; give direct employment to 
1,200,000 workers; support one penon in 
every twelve; load 4,000,000 freight cars yearly; 
grow spontaneously on one-fourth of the Nation's 
land; and supply the material for a hundred in- 
dustrial groups and 4,500 commodities. These 
are the trees that will go on growing and regrow- 
ing forever; blessing America as aforetime with 
inexhaustible natural wealth, the best and dear- 
est of homes and the universal material of 
civilization. 






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THE STORY OF WOOD 

was prepared under the direction of 
THE NATIONAL LUMBER MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION 

WASHINOTON. D. C. 



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